Planning IT-installations – Defining the scope of the project (#2)

This is part #2 in the series of postings “Planning IT Installations”.
Part #1 was the Introduction to the series of this postings: Planning IT-installations – Abstract (#1)

Introduction

OK, so you were assigned to this cool new project.

So what now?

First you have to check what exactly your scope of work is. In this series I’ll use an example project, consisting of a Fujitsu-Siemens Primepower 650 cluster in a high-available environment. The purpose of this cluster is to be a database-cluster, serving your company’s most precious secrets.

It’s your task, as the responsible planning-engineer, to make the best possible database-solution of the sold hardware, sail around the problems your sales-department created, deal with all those customer-requests, do all the work which is required so that the installation-staff can build this mother and be responsible for all IT- and engineering related problems which might occur.

Your Mission

You are the responsible planning-engineer for the project “A new high-available database for Antarctica’s ice-core samples“.

You boss gave you the following tasks:

  • A dual-node, Fujitsu-Siemens, Primepower 650 cluster with two EMC CX300 Fibrechannel Storage cabinets was sold to the customer as the cutting-edge database-solution ever. The solution shall be high-available.
  • Go and talk to the customer and check, if the sold solution will really work as sold.
  • Plan and implement the cluster with the delivered components
  • Make it work
  • Make the customer to sign the acceptance-test handbook
  • …profit!

Meet the customer

You need to do two things:

  1. A site-survey to check, if the cluster you’re about to plan, really fits into your customer’s environment
  2. A customer-workshop to sort all all requirements which have to be met

In what order?!

OK, you got lot’s of things to do. What to do first?

  1. Evaluate the bill of materials to see how your hardware really does look like
  2. Think about, how you assemble the racks with all the material you have
  3. Make a questionary for the customer, if the racks, you planned, fit into their data-center.

Evaluate the bill of materials #1 – what did you get from sales?

You really want to know what was sold, don’t you? So the first thing is to get a bill of materials from your sales-department to check out what was sold. Be sure to get the real list. With all details. Up to the last cable.

Your list – or better, the list in our example – looks like that:

Partnumber D:GPS65-GM21-K01 – PW650 2 node, 4×1,89GHz, 8GB, Sol9:

Position Partnumber Description Amount
10 D:FCKAB-MM-C20L FC Kabel MMF 20m, Connector LC-LC 2
20 D:GP7KB-2015 UTP CAT 5 Enhanced, 15m 14
30 D:GP7KB-2015 UTP CAT 5 Enhanced, 15m 1
40 D:GP7KB-1420 UTP CAT 5 IC-Kabel 2xRJ45 8pin(S) 20m 1
50 D:GPRAC-BG52 PRIMECENTER Rack 38HE, 1000mm tief 1
60 D:KB258-C250 Netzltg. Kaltgeraet 2,5m (Stift-Buchse) 2
70 D:GP7KB-2005 UTP CAT 5 Enhanced, 5m 2
80 D:GPRAC-KB04RE16 RCA4-Kabel, Port1-16, RJ45/SubD9, 5m 2
90 D:GP7KB-1204 RCI Kabel RJ45 6pin(S)-RJ45 6pin(S) 4m 1
100 D:GPRAC-ZB30 Blindblende fuer 19″ Rack, 1HE 7
110 D:GPRAC-ZB32 Blindblende fuer 19″ Rack, 3HE 1
120 D:GPRAC-SV011 SDL CEE 1x16A > 10xIEC320-10A 2
130 D:GPRAC-SV121 SDL CEE 1x32A > 8xIEC320-10A 2
140 D:GPRAC-ZB5214 Rear-Einbaukit fuer Hubs/Switche 2
150 D:GPRAC-ZB5012 Erdungskit f. Primecenter Rack2 1
160 D:GPRAC-ZB22E Halteboden fuer RCA4 und RPS-Box 1
170 D:GPRAC-RCA4P RCA4plus mit 8 seriellen Ports 1
180 D:GP650-GM15 PW650(EF) GHz-CPU, 8CPU/64GB/8PCI 1
190 D:GP650-ZE84 CPU Submodul 1,89GHz SLC 3MB f.PW650(DE) 4
200 D:GP70M-SP65 Speichererweiterung 8 GB f PW650-1500 1
210 U24529-C423 Solaris 9 RTU PRIMEPOWER 1
220 D:GP70M-SP65 Speichererweiterung 8 GB f PW650-1500 1
230 D:GP71F-FP90 Hard Disk 73 GB 3,5″ 10k rpm 2
240 D:GP70F-CL21 Quad Fast/Gigabit Ethernet Contr., RJ45 2
250 D:GP70F-CL19 Gigabit Ethernet NIC, Fibre Optic LC 2
260 D:GP650-SV24 DUAL POWER FEED OPTION f. PW 650(CDEF) 1
270 U11420-C665 PCLPAS-P V42 (SOLARIS PW) NR -CL8CPU 1
280 U11420-C635 PCLSIS V42 (SOLARIS PW) NR -CL8CPU 1
290 D:GP70M-BG61 Ext PCI box 12 slot f. PW 650/850 f.PCR2 1
300 D:GP650-GM15 PW650(EF) GHz-CPU, 8CPU/64GB/8PCI 1
310 D:GP650-ZE84 CPU Submodul 1,89GHz SLC 3MB f.PW650(DE) 4
320 D:GP70M-SP65 Speichererweiterung 8 GB f PW650-1500 1
330 U24529-C423 Solaris 9 RTU PRIMEPOWER 1
340 D:GP70M-SP65 Speichererweiterung 8 GB f PW650-1500 1
350 D:GP71F-FP90 Hard Disk 73 GB 3,5″ 10k rpm 2
360 D:GP70F-CL21 Quad Fast/Gigabit Ethernet Contr., RJ45 2
370 D:GP70F-CL19 Gigabit Ethernet NIC, Fibre Optic LC 2
380 D:GP650-SV24 DUAL POWER FEED OPTION f. PW 650(CDEF) 1
390 U11420-C665 PCLPAS-P V42 (SOLARIS PW) NR -CL8CPU 1
400 U11420-C635 PCLSIS V42 (SOLARIS PW) NR -CL8CPU 1
410 D:GP70M-BG61 Ext PCI box 12 slot f. PW 650/850 f.PCR2 1

Partnumber D:GPSRC-CX3B1-K01 – 2x CX300_S per 15x 73GB 15k

10 D:FCKAB-MM-C20L FC Kabel MMF 20m, Connector LC-LC 4
20 D:FCKAB-MM-C05L FC Kabel MMF 5m, Connector LC-LC 4
30 D:GPRAC-ZB5211 Tragewinkel 1HE für 19″ Einbauten PCR2 1
50 D:FCX32R-73FH FC CX300_S Basism.15x73GB/15k SI COM 1
60 D:FCRAIL-2 Montage-Satz FibreCAT f. PrimeCenterRack 1
80 D:FCNAV300-WG FibreCat SwLic NaviMgmt f CX300 WG 1
90 D:FCNAV-WGKIT FibreCat SwKit NaviMgmt WG 1
100 D:FCAGSUN-KIT Navisph.Agent Sw.Kit Solaris (per site) 1
110 D:GP70F-CF34 Fibre Channel Cont. Dual Port 2Gbit/s 4
120 U24529-C530 Multipath V1.1B NR (Sparc) 2
130 D:GPRAC-ZB5211 Tragewinkel 1HE für 19″ Einbauten PCR2 1
150 D:FCX32R-73FH FC CX300_S Basism.15x73GB/15k SI COM 1
160 D:FCRAIL-2 Montage-Satz FibreCAT f. PrimeCenterRack 1
180 D:FCNAV300-WG FibreCat SwLic NaviMgmt f CX300 WG 1
190 D:FCNAV-WGKIT FibreCat SwKit NaviMgmt WG 1
200 D:FCAGSUN-KIT Navisph.Agent Sw.Kit Solaris (per site) 1

Evaluation the bill of material part #2 – So what do we have?

The first list, about the machines, tell us the following facts:

  • We have two 38-RU racks (Pos. 40 and 390)
  • We have two Primepower 650 machines with 8 CPUs and 64 GB of RAM each (Pos. 270 and 600)
  • Those PW650 machine were ordered with the dual-power feed option (Pos. 340 and 670)
  • We have two DN30 SCSI-cabinets (Pos. 200 and 530)
  • We have one dumb Ethernet-switche for networking (Pos. 190)
  • We have, for each rack, an IEC320 8-port power-outlet (Pos. 130) and a 3-port Schuko power-outlet per rack (Pos. 120)
  • Lot’s of misc. stuff

The second list, about the EMC Clarions, tells us:

  • We have two CX300 base-cabinets with 15x73GB (Pos. 50 and 150)
  • Both cabinets have reduntant FibreChannel ports (Pos. 110)
  • Everyhing, like cables and licenses, is included

Bringing it all together

Now that you checked what sales sold and groked, what’s really going to be delivered, you have to make up a rough proposal which you can present to the customer. You have to make up an idea how the racks exactly have too look and what components are included.

Now you have to figure out what exactly you have to do.

What Do you have?

The bill of materials tells you a lot of things. It tells you that you have…

  • Two racks where your two cluster-node will be builtin
  • All the necessary components to power up the system when thinking of electricity (Pos. 130 and 120)

All those facts tell you that you’re pretty much independant of all the problems which might occur.

What do you need?

In this certain case, you, as the planner, are pretty much independant now. But yet you need to persuade the customer to include your two racks into their datacenter.

So, when talking about those requirements, you need to check out what exact things the customer has to provide to meet your expectations to make the cluster running.

That include things like:

  • How many power feed to provide?
  • What’s the footprint of my racks? How heavy are they? What’s the maximum heat-dissipation – can the customer’s air-conditioning cope with our system?

The scope

Now that you figured out what was delivered and got a basic idea of what you have to do to implement this solution on your customers’s site, you have to define the scope of your project.

  • The scope of your project is your assigned mission.
  • The scope includes to evaluate, if the given hardware is enough to be set up in your customer’s datacenters.
  • You need to check if the hardware is good enough to be set up in your customer’s datacenter; (Example: You’re about to set up two cluster nodes in two different server-rooms. Those rooms are 100 km apart. Implicite action: Go and persuade project-management ro buy FC-switches and LAN-Switsches witj LH-modules.)
  • You’re responsible to get the cluster working.

This is the end of this posting. All remaining questions will be answered in the next postings.

The next posting is due by this Sunday, July 1st.

If you have any questions, do not hesitate to get in touch with me.

2 Responses to Planning IT-installations – Defining the scope of the project (#2)

  1. […] Planning IT-installations – Defining the scope of the project (#2) Possibly related posts: (automatically generated)Public service annoucementStart Your […]

  2. […] it project scope sample I bet you found this. And yes, I know, I should be writing the rest of the […]

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